Document Category: Evidence-Based Practice

Realizing the Potential of Research in Child Welfare

This essay discusses our interest in the use of research within the child welfare system in order to: (1) stimulate interest in understanding the use and impact of research evidence in child welfare and (2) offer promising strategies for tackling this challenge.

Strategies to Promote Research Use in Child Welfare 

Policymakers, agency leaders, and practitioners need access to meaningful research evidence to ensure that the services their child welfare agencies are providing are effective in supporting children and families to achieve positive outcomes. This brief aims to assist in this process by providing strategies to connect organizations, stakeholders, leaders, and policy makers in the process …

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Adapting Evidence-Based Programs in Child Welfare

This webinar explores how child welfare leaders and program developers can work together to adapt an evidence-based approach to the specific needs of a state — and further hone the approach as it moves to another jurisdiction. 

Implementing Evidence-Based Child Welfare: The New York City experience

The goals of the preventive services Evidence-Based Model (EBM) initiative are to improve outcomes by improving family functioning and child well-being, reducing repeat maltreatment and preventing placement in foster care. This report gives an in-depth theory of implementation along with the strengths and challenges of the implementation process as experienced by New York City’s Administration …

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Expanding the Evidence Universe: Doing Better by Knowing More

This paper offers a five-part set of concrete actions that the philanthropic, public, non-profit, academic, business and entrepreneurial sectors can take to build a wider and deeper evidence base that the author believes will contribute to substantially improved outcomes for disadvantaged children, families, and neighborhoods. 

A Lot to Lose: A Call to Rethink What Constitutes “Evidence” in Finding Social Interventions that Work

This paper argues that experimental methodology is a poor fit for judging the impact of social intervention program models; the authors identify the risks inherent in the continued privileging of experimental designs over all others, and offer a set of starting points for rethinking evaluation to ensure greater accountability without reducing the chances that those …

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