Document Category: Cultural Responsiveness

Promoting Antiracist Child Welfare Practice: NCWWI 1-page Summary

This 1-pager summarizes a study where authors interviewed 16 regional- and state-level public child welfare agency administrators representing 13 states on the inequities they see in the child welfare system, the major challenges they’ve experienced advancing antiracist practice, and strategies they believe will be successful in moving the field forward.

Onboarding

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians worked with the QIC-WD to develop an onboarding program. This video highlights the experience of workers, supervisors, and leaders who speak to the importance of cultural understanding and implementing a process that introduces workers to all functions of the agency as well as the job.

Workforce Supports for LGBT Employees

An overview of organizational policies and practices that are thought to improve the work experiences of LGBT employees and foster diversity within an organization and why they are important.

Cultural Intelligence

An overview of cultural intelligence, the importance of it, and what contributes to it.

Using a Culturally Responsive Leadership Framework: NCWWI 1-page Summary

The authors developed a culturally responsive leadership framework (CRLF) to address context, distributive leadership, and cultural responsiveness. Examining these elements strengthens an organization’s ability to meet the changing needs of employees and communities and helps leaders create inclusive environments for diverse stakeholders.

American Indian/Alaska Natives Curriculum Content Evaluation Guide

In keeping with the Council on Social Work Education’s competency-based education standards and social work competencies this curriculum content guide provides general information that social work educators should know when working with American Indian/Alaska Native populations.

Learning, Leading, Changing: Collaborating to Enhance ICWA Knowledge and Practice

Held on March 21, 2022, this learning exchange focused on enhancing knowledge and understanding of ICWA and tribal sovereignty through partnerships between schools of social work and child welfare training units in public and tribal child welfare organizations. Panelists shared examples from partnerships in Georgia and Minnesota.